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Team Members

LabPic2014_4

 

Director

Carlo C. DiClemente, Ph.D.

Carlo DiClemente photo

Carlo DiClemente completed his doctorate in clinical psychology at the University of Rhode Island in 1978. He joined the faculty at UMBC as Professor of Psychology and Department Chair in 1995 after several years as an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Houston and at the University of Texas Medical School and the Texas Research Institute of Mental Sciences. Dr. DiClemente’s research examines the stages of the process of human intentional behavior change particularly as related to health and addictive behaviors. He is the co-developer of the Transtheoretical Model of change which has been used by researchers in the areas of cancer prevention, HIV risk reduction, dietary change, exercise, occupational safety, and rehabilitation of health and addictive behaviors. He has co-authored several books, The Transtheoretical Model and Changing for Good as well as numerous articles and book chapters. Dr. DiClemente serves as a consultant to a number of institutions and research projects and has an active grant funded program of research in collaboration with colleagues at the University of Maryland at Baltimore and at University of Maryland College Park, University of Texas Health Sciences Center, University of Houston and other institutions.

E-mail: diclemen@umbc.edu

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Graduate Student Assistants / Mentees of Dr. DiClemente

 

Taylor Berens Crouch, M.A.

Taylor is a sixth year graduate student in the in the Clinical/Behavioral Medicine track of the Human Services Psychology program at UMBC. She is currently completing her pre-doctoral internship at the Vanderbilt/Tennessee Valley VA Consortium in Nashville, TN. Taylor received her B.S. in Psychology and Spanish from Virginia Tech in 2010, where she conducted research on personalized normative interventions for heavy drinking college students. She then worked at Virginia Commonwealth University’s School of Medicine in the Office of Assessment and Evaluation Studies, where she was involved in research and program evaluation in the medical school. At UMBC, she worked as an assistant evaluator on the MD3 (Maryland MDs Making a Difference) and SBIRT in Social Work projects. Her personal research has investigated predictors of substance use relapse, the effect of affect regulation and cognitive factors on risky health behaviors, and implementation and evaluation of motivational, patient-centered health behavior interventions.

E-mail: tberens1@umbc.edu

Catherine Corno, M.A.

Cate is a fifth year graduate student in the Clinical/Community-Applied Social Psychology track of the Human Services Psychology doctoral program at UMBC. She received her B.A. in Psychology from Georgetown University in 2008, where she conducted research on Alzheimer’s disease and the coping process of those caring for Alzheimer’s sufferers. She then worked at Brown University’s Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies (CAAS) on brief motivational interventions for non-college attending young adults’ heavy alcohol use and adults’ heavy alcohol use and related sexual risk behaviors. Currently, Cate works as a graduate assistant for the No Wrong Door project as part of the Center for Community Collaboration (CCC) and as a center specialist for the MDQuit Resource Center for Quitting Use and Initiation of Tobacco (MDQuit). She is interested in studying the processes of change for heavy substance use and related risk behaviors (in particular, sexual risk) among at-risk community samples.

E-mail: ccorno1@umbc.edu

Meagan Graydon, M.A.

Meagan is a fifth year graduate student in the Clinical/Behavioral Medicine track of the Human Services Psychology doctoral program at UMBC. She received her B.A. in Psychology from the University of Virginia in 2010 where she worked at the Center for Addiction Research and Education investigating the pharmaceutical interventions on cravings for both alcohol and cocaine users. In the two years before graduate school she worked at the Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center conducting triage assessments for behavioral health services in an integrated primary care mental health setting. At UMBC she is interested in interventions for substance use and co-occurring disorders, particularly PTSD. Meagan is currently working on the No Wrong Door project as part of the Center for Community Collaboration (CCC) and a resource center specialist at the Maryland Resource Center for Quitting Use & Initiation of Tobacco (MDQuit).

E-mail: mgraydo1@umbc.edu

Daniel Knoblach, M.A.

Dan is a third year graduate student in the Clinical/Behavioral Medicine track of the Human Services Psychology doctoral program at UMBC. Dan received his B.A. in Natural Science at Saint John’s University in Collegeville, MN and his M.A. in Counseling Psychology at the University of Minnesota. Before coming to UMBC, Dan worked on a team at Treatment Research Institute in Philadelphia aiming to improve the translation of evidence based practices in community behavioral health centers by developing curricula focused on CBT skill development, 12-step facilitation, and better matching of client needs to community services. Prior to joining TRI in 2007, Dan has held teaching and clinical positions in Minnesota and Massachusetts. While at UMBC, Dan hopes to continue research focused on implementation science and the role positive, strength-based activities play in long-term recovery.

E-mail: kdan11@umbc.edu

Shayla Thrash, M.A.

Shayla is a seventh year graduate student in the in the Clinical/Behavioral Medicine track of the Human Services Psychology program at UMBC. She is currently completing her internship at the Baltimore VA Medical Center. She received her B.S. in Psychology from Michigan State University in 2010, where she conducted research on motivation to change health behaviors among college students (specifically, smoking cessation and dietary change). Shayla is interested in studying health behavior change as it pertains to addictive behaviors, obesity, and eating disorders.

Email: sthrash1@umbc.edu

Alicia Wiprovnick, B.S.

Alicia is a third year graduate student in the Clinical track of the Human Services Psychology Doctoral Program. She completed a B.S. in Human Development at Cornell University in 2010. Before coming to UMBC, Alicia worked for one year in a neuropathology lab at the New York State Psychiatric Institute and then for two years as a research assistant at Columbia Addictions Services and Psychotherapy Intervention Research (CASPIR). At CASPIR, Alicia coordinated a randomized controlled trial studying the mechanisms of action in motivational interviewing for problem drinkers looking to moderate their alcohol consumption. In the HABITS lab, Alicia works on MDQuit and the Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) Certificate Program. At UMBC, she also works with Dr. Robin Barry on research pertaining to romantic relationships and couple communication. Specifically, she is interested in ambivalence in romantic relationships and how it is related to relationship health, mental health and well-being.

Email: awipro1@umbc.edu

 

Additional HABITS Lab Graduate Student Assistants

 

Lindsay Emery, M.S.

Lindsay is a third year graduate student in the Clinical/Community and Applied Social Psychology track of the Human Services Psychology Doctoral Program. She received a B.A. in Psychology from Dickinson College in 2009 and went on to receive an M.S. in Clinical Psychology from Loyola University Maryland in 2011. Prior to starting the program at UMBC, Lindsay worked for two years as a psychometrist in the Division of Medical Psychology at Johns Hopkins Hospital, conducting neuropsychological evaluations for persons with dementia, traumatic brain injury, cognitive impairment, and various other neurological and psychological brain disorders. Currently, Lindsay works with Dr. Anne Brodsky on research relating to issues of immigration, psychological sense of community, and understanding how individuals relate and belong within various communities. She is specifically interested in pursuing research relating to issues of racial identity, risk and resilience, sense of community, and exploring these concepts among minority and marginalized populations. In the HABITS lab, she works on Social Work SBIRT Project.

E-mail: lemery1@umbc.edu 

 Aliya Webermann, M.A.

Aliya is a first year graduate student in the Clinical/Community Psychology track of the Human Services Psychology doctoral program at UMBC. She received her B.A. in psychology from UMD College Park in 2011, and her M.A. in clinical psychology from Towson University in 2015. Her research concerns risk factors, prevention, and treatment of partner abuse, focusing primarily on partner abusive men. She also researches the treatment of complex trauma and dissociation, and how to integrate a trauma-informed framework into treatments for partner abuse. Aliya works as a graduate assistant with the Center for Community Collaboration, and also with the MDQuit Resource Center.

Email: aliyaw1@umbc.edu

HABITS Lab Faculty & Staff Members

 

Amber Norwood, Ph.D.

Dr. Norwood serves as a Consulting Psychologist for MDQuit and the Center for Community Collaboration.

E-mail: norwood3@umbc.edu

 

Rebecca Schacht, Ph.D.

Dr. Schact is currently Clinic Director of the Psychology Training Clinic at UMBC. In the HABITS Lab, she serves as an evaluator and research scientist on MDQuit and the Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) Certificate Program.

E-mail: rschacht@umbc.edu

 

Terri Harold

Terri serves as the Center Coordinator for MDQuit.

E-mail: harold@umbc.edu 

 

Krystle F. Pierce, M.P.P.

Krystle is the Project Director for MDQuit and the Center for Community Collaboration.

E-mail: krystle.pierce@umbc.edu 

 

June Sutherland, M.S.

June serves as a Project Coordinator for MDQuit and the Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) Certificate Program.

E-mail: jsuther@umbc.edu

Shakyra Radcliff, B.S

Shakyra serves as a Project Assistant for MDQuit and the Center for Community Collaboration. She received her Bachelor’s in Psychology from Towson University in 2012 and will be returning to Towson in Fall 2016 to pursue her Master’s in Health Science with a concentration in Community Health. Prior to coming on board to UMBC, she worked at the Baltimore County Department of Health providing smoking prevention and cessation services to the residents of the County. Shakyra also previously worked as a Psychiatric Rehabilitation Counselor Providing counseling services to adults diagnosed with chronic mental illness.